March 2, 2015

Local Liquor Control: The Facts



It contributes $30 million in annual profit to the County – helping fund schools, transportation, aid for the vulnerable in our midst, and more.

It helps to keep taxes lower.

Lower alcohol consumption and higher revenue for public purposes than other jurisdictions.

There are no liquor stores on every corner.

The system makes it harder for underage individuals to purchase alcohol and provides more education for the public and for servers as well.

Control of local sales better protects the public health, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Read about the benefits of local control.

Learn about the public health benefits.

Visit Department of Liquor Control for more information.

18 comments:

  1. Effective licensing and charging for those licenses would allow the market to determine the most efficient route what the DLC currently does - and does poorly.

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    1. The problem is the following: we already effectively license and charge for same. Licensing, however, at whatever rate feasible, would only bring in a tiny fraction of what the County now earns every year, which is spent on schools, transportation, etc. and holds taxes down. The market would have as its first (and only) priority maximizing its own income. By having local control we can provide access to a legal product but also modulate demand to help keep out industry products aimed at kids, better prevent underage purchases, and better protect the public health. In Washington State, when they privatized, the number of liquor outlets increased by 500 percent

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  2. I love our county stores, great selection and pricing.

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  3. According to this model cigarettes and unhealthy foods, should also only be sold by a State Controlled store. In fact , if the State controlled everything we shouldn't have to pay any taxes..yeah.

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    1. The public health challenge to the society at-large from runaway alcohol consumption, arguably, places it in a bit of a different category than cigarettes and unhealthy foods, neither of which are controlled to the same extent by any local jurisdiction, whether they share Montgomery County’s kind of system or not.

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  5. I would encourage everyone to watch the PBS Ken Burns documentary "Prohibition" available on Netflix and for free on the pbs.org website (http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/prohibition/watch-video/#id=2082675582) to fully educate themselves on the true roots of prohibition and local control, then form their own opinions instead of reading the talking points provided here by NABCA.

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    1. Great documentary. Lesson of Prohibition is you can’t ban but you must control due to the disastrous consequences of over-consumption to individuals and the society.

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  6. Clearly such a great success, we should governmentalize all industries and sales because we know how good the government is at running things.
    This is nothing but a consumer tax to fatten their payrolls (which is the one thing they are ACTUALLY good at)!

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    1. Actually, just between 2010 and 2012, County Executive Ike Leggett REDUCED the number of County employees by more than 10 percent. ALL local governments control liquor – which is another lesson of Prohibition – it must be controlled in some form. About 30 percent of Americans live in local control jurisdictions similar to Montgomery’s in some way. With local control, we can make a legal product available in a way that promotes moderate consumption and better protects public health and against underage use. Plus, profits STAY in the County – not in the pockets of liquor distributors – to do good.

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  7. This program is ##%)#%*)#(. Oh wait, this is YOUR blog.... uh, it's a great program, please take more of my money - you're only 49th in growth, you have one more spot to fall!

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    1. Sorry, but Montgomery County is one of the best places in the nation to raise a family, earn a living and grow a business. And, without the $30 million in profits annually, taxes might have to go up further to make up the difference. Over the past eight years, all County taxes as a percent of residents’ income have gone DOWN 10 percent. That’s good, right?

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  8. WELL if you have 30 million in profits and claim some of it goes to the roads then why are the roads in monkey county so messed up it's like you need a 4 wheel drive truck to venture out on these roads.at lease you are giving the repair and tire shops profits. so why not fix these roads with some of the profits

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    1. Actually, these monies are even now being used to improve County roads. Using funds from Department of Liquor Control bonds, the County improved a dozen County road/State road intersections. Over the past 8 years, the County Executive increased spending on primary and arterial road resurfacing from $37 million to $67 million (80 percent) and increased residential and rural road resurfacing from $17 million in the eight years before Leggett took office to $117 million in his eight years – a 676 percent increase. Also, the County has done a first-ever, top-to-bottom road inventory.

      We are on it but – you are right – there’s more to do. Keep in mind, however, that the State is responsible for any road that has a number (Rockville Pike, Georgia Avenue, Randolph Road, Viers Mill, River Road, Connecticut, Wisconsin aves., etc.

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  9. We have "privatized" many industries and it did not work, but we cannot change it back. The County is doing a good job, it’s earning revenue that otherwise would be covered by additional taxing, so why fix it if it ain’t broken?

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  12. Local control is evidence-based public health policy. There's plenty of good alcohol to be had in Montgomery County, at reasonable prices.

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